slug Quotes

Scott is gone.I've had two days with this truth. This truth and me, we're acquainted now, past the shock of our first unhappy meeting and into the uneasy-cohabitation stage. Its barbs are slightly duller than they were that first night, when even breathing felt agonizing and wrong. Tootsie and Marjorie hovered over me, waiting to see whether I'd collapse, while Mama looked on, white-faced, from her rocker by the fire. "Gone?" I would whisper, to no-one in particular. I, too, waited for me to be overwhelmed - but all that happened was what happens to anyone who has lost their one love: my heart cleaved into two parts, before and foreverafterward.

- Therese Anne Fowler, Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald

I love her, and that's the beginning and end of everything.

- F. Scott Fitzgerald, Dear Scott, Dearest Zelda: The Love Letters of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald

I don't want to live-I want to love first and live incidentally.

- Zelda Fitzgerald

All I want to be is very young always and very irresponsible and to feel that my life is my own-to live and be happy and die in my own way to please myself

- Zelda Fitzgerald

Every sort of trouble I can think of, we've tried it out- become expert at some of it, even, so much so that I've come to wonder whether artists in particularity seek out hard times the way flowers turn their faces toward the sun.

- Therese Anne Fowler, Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald

The purpose of life on earth is that the soul should grow - So Growl By doing what is right.

- Zelda Fitzgerald

Nobody has ever measured not even poets how much the heart can hold.

- Zelda Fitzgerald

I don’t want to live— 
I want to love first, and live…incidentally.

- Zelda Fitzgerald, Dear Scott, Dearest Zelda: The Love Letters of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald

Nobody has ever measured even poets how much a heart can hold.

- Zelda Fitzgerald

With adolescent Nietzscheanism, she already planned to escape on the world's reversals from the sense of suffocation that seemed to her to be eclipsing her family, her sisters, and mother. She, she told herself, would move brightly along high places and stop to trespass and admire, and if the fine was a heavy one—well, there was no good in saving up beforehand to pay it. Full of these presumptuous resolves, she promised herself that if, in the future, her soul should come starving and crying for bread it should eat the stone she might have to offer without complaint or remorse. Relentlessly she convinced herself that the only thing of any significance was to take what she wanted when she could. She did her best.

- Zelda Fitzgerald

You focus on telling stories,
we do everything else.